Tiny Worlds Sculptures by Jorge Mayet

Cuban artist Jorge Mayet is creating his own miniature worlds. Attached to white walls, many of his sculptures seem to float in the sky, their bottom sides revealing raw soil and roots as if they have ripped free from all that is below. Other sculptures seem to explode in mid-air, their small wooden houses becoming a cloud of floating splinters. This is no destructive event, however, but one that makes things move and spread.

Mayet builds his tiny worlds predominantly from green painted sponges, paper mache, wire and cloth. His most recent exhibition took place in Rio de Janeiro, Brasil, at Galeria Inox. You can see more on their Facebook page or learn more about Mayet here.

via

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Camera Obscura by Abelardo Morell

"Originally born in Havana, Cuba, photographer Abelardo Morell has embraced the classic technique of camera obscura, a method used photographically through the use of pinhole cameras. Morell finds rooms with windows that offer unique and spectacular views from the Eiffel Tower to the Italian countryside and then blocks out all the light from the windows with the exception of a pinhole which causes the narrow channel of light to project an exact upside down image of the scene outside on the opposite wall. Next, Morell sets up a large format camera facing the projection on the wall and creates a long exposure photograph revealing the juxtaposition of the actual room meshing with the landscape outside the window." via Juxtapoz

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Cesar Santos Legendary Art Remix

What if Picasso and Rembrandt had met to have cocktails in 1953? You can imagine the talks they would have had: electric, inspired, and maybe even heated. The work that could have spawned from such a conversation might have looked a bit like that of Cesar Santos. His paintings seemingly bring the works of masters – from the Renaissance to the nineteenth century to Modernism – together, juxtaposing their styles one on top of the other. He call the series (and it is) Syncretism